Lakeshore Bridge over the 16 Mile Creek: Past to Present

Lakeshore Bridge
Lakeshore Bridge over the 16 Mile Creek: Past to Present
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Nolan A Machan

Nolan A Machan

Nolan Machan is the Publisher of OakvilleNews.Org and has over 41 years of local Oakville knowledge. He is committed to providing Oakville residents with the most up-to-date information about our great town.

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On Friday, November 17, 2017 at 3:30 PM the new Lakeshore bridge spanning the 16 Mile Creek will open to the public with an official ribbon cutting.

This latest latest Lakeshore Bridge life expectancy is 75 years according to the Town of Oakville. The capital allocation for 2017 was $10,600,00 for the new bridge, according to Councillor Tom Adams.

Lakeshore Bridge

A Barges was used to transport people and goods across the 16 Mile Creek prior to the construction of the first bridge built in  1832. Image Courtesy : Oakville Historical Society

However, crossing the 16 Mile Creek was originally achieved by a barge that was attached to a rope. The rope was secured at each side of the creek. In 1832 the first bridge was constructed, the second was constructed in 1850. A third bridge was built in 1878. The life span for each of these bridges was around 20 years.

Lakeshore Bridge

Aberdeen Bridge c 1900; Image: Oakville Historical Society

The forth Lakeshore Bridge was the Aberdeen swing bridge named for Governor General, Lord Aberdeen, and officially opened on September 18, 1895 at a cost of $11,000. The swing bridge was built to allow schooners to easily move up and down stream. The Aberdeen bridge was demolished in 1924 after 29 years of service.

The fifth bridge replacing the Aberdeen Bridge lasted until 1968, and the turntable of the Aberdeen foundation was still in place until 1968. The centennial square complex housing the Oakville Public Library – Central Branch along with Centennial Pool were completed in December 1967. The Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts was completed 10 years later.  The Lakeshore Bridge demolished to make way for the latest bridge life span was 49 years.

The reconstruction of the new Lakeshore Bridge has caused congestion on the Randall – Rebecca Bridge as vehicles were re-routed off Lakeshore Road East and West. To mitigate congestion, Navy Street, a one way street that ran from Lakeshore Road East to Randall, became two way. The decision to make Navy Street two way is part of the redevelopment plans for Downtown Oakville.

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The new bridge incorporates elements that will be reflected in the redesign of Downtown Oakville with wider side walks combined with a concrete wall that will separate pedestrians from vehicular traffic,  bike lanes on either side, lookouts located at the midway point, and led lighting.

The official opening of the new Lakeshore Bridge is ahead of schedule, and couldn’t come at a better time since Friday evening is the official Downtown Oakville Christmas Tree Lighting, and the Santa Claus Parade taking place on Saturday, November 18, 2017 will maintain its traditional route.

Lakeshore Bridge

Construction crews working hard to do the final touches on November 15, 2017, prior to the official opening on November 17, 2017. Photo Credit: OakvilleNews.Org

 

 

Information Sources: Town of Oakville, and the Oakville Historical Society.

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Readers Comments (1)

  1. Mark Dalton says:

    Fantastic article !! well done and very informative Thanx

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