Oakville moving ahead with redevelopment plans for the Former Hospital Site

Former Hospital Site
Oakville moving ahead with redevelopment plans for the Former Hospital Site

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Gisele Shaw

Gisele Shaw

Gisele Shaw is the Manager of Corporate Communication for the town of Oakville since 2002. Prior to working for the town she worked for Halton Region as a communications specialist. She is a graduate of Humber College.

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Much progress has been done on the redevelopment plans for the former hospital (OTMH) site and the town is inviting residents to attend an open house on Thursday, December 1, 2016 at Town Hall to learn more. The town also encourages residents to take part in one of two interactive consultation sessions that day into the new community centre proposed for the site.

“Council believes community engagement and public consultation are key to a successful redevelopment,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “That’s why we are encouraging residents from across Oakville to receive up-to-date information and share their ideas at the upcoming open house and consultation.”

The Former Hospital Site Project is divided into three phases. In the new year, the town will be entering into Phase 3, which is about reinventing the site. This phase involves demolishing the buildings, conducting a community needs assessment, determining the appropriate location for the centre and park, and developing a plan for potential housing on any remaining lands.

In addition, the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) is undertaking a third party study on the future health needs of the Halton area which will include the area surrounding the former hospital site. The study will address residents request for consideration of local healthcare services provided in the area. Once the results of the study are known, the town and the LHIN will further investigate opportunities for joint programming at the former hospital site including opportunities related to a health hub.

Demolition is anticipated to start in mid-2017 and take eight to12 months to complete. The development of the community centre will take three years to complete with an opening scheduled for September 2020.

As part of the town’s Parks, Recreation and Library Facilities Master Plan, the proposed amenities of the community centre include an indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), gymnasium, youth space, active living space, multi-purpose space and community rooms. The public consultation meetings on Thursday, December 1, 2016 will focus on confirming these amenities prior to the start of design in 2017.

“We believe that community centres and the recreation experiences they provide play a vital role in supporting individual, family and community wellbeing,” said Colleen Bell, commissioner of Community Development. “We want you to engage in conversations with us about what the centre will provide. Your input will give us valuable information we need to create a centre that meets the needs of all residents.”

Since taking possession in April 2016, a number of in-depth studies of the buildings and the land have been completed to better understand the site. The town has:

  1. assessed the hospital buildings for hazardous materials and for any potential site contamination.
  2. completed structural assessments of the parking garage and the former Oakville Trafalgar High School (OTHS) – a designated heritage resource.
  3. completed public consultation on the on-street parking restrictions in the area, and
  4. established a non-binding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the town and the Mississauga
  5. Halton Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) regarding the potential concept of a community health hub in town.

To learn more about what’s been done on the site, and what’s coming up, residents can drop into the open house in the South Atrium at Town Hall anytime between 5 – 7 p.m.

For those who want to provide input into the community centre proposed amenities, there are two consultation sessions being held in the Bronte/Palermo Rooms before and after the open house. One from 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. and a second one from 7 – 9 p.m.

If you plan to attend the open house or consultation sessions and have any accessibility needs, please let us know before December 1 by contacting ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or by filling out the online accessible feedback form.

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses. The Former Hospital Site Project is about the town working with our community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park, and potential future housing to meet the needs of Oakville residents. The Former Hospital Site Project is about completing this work over five years (2015 to 2020).

The former site consists of lands on the south side of Macdonald Road between Reynolds Street and Allan Street. The property includes the existing hospital building and the Wyndham Manor Long Term Care Centre.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit the Town of Oakville website at oakville.ca and use the search words “former hospital”. You can also email any questions to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca or contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.

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Readers Comments (7)

  1. Adele says:

    The city should adjust the bylaw to force the builders to plant trees for each unit they build. Shame to keep losing green lives . Thanks

     Reply
    • Sandra says:

      Developers pay park levy fees which pay for parks, playgrounds, trees!, etc. It is then the responsibility of the municipality to ensure the trees are planted.

       Reply
  2. OakvilleRes says:

    How about some affordable housing? There is so much new technology and innovation when it comes to affordable and sustainable living.

     Reply
  3. Doris Moorcroft says:

    How about renovating or building accommodation for low income seniors or market tied to income. I am astounded at the amount of money required to live in one of the high priced retirement homes in the area. Unfortunately the court ordered me to pay in my divorce proceedings and I am now a low income senior. Leave part of the hospital as a hospital and the rest of the area for women who are on their own and have no family. Affordable housing is the key to helping these women.

     Reply
  4. Doris Moorcroft says:

    I took the trouble to comment in a reasonable and well thought out manner and it has completely disappeared. I hope it is out there somewhere and it can be rescued and put here.

     Reply
  5. Morar Murray-Hayes says:

    I am concerned to know if Wyndham Manor is going to be maintained/enlarged and what will happen to the old high school and the large family of chimney swifts living in the school’s chimneys.

     Reply
  6. bkennedy says:

    Housing for former but no longer middle class seniors is an excellent idea. Poverty doesn’t disappear at age 65 it just escalates
    Also arts facilities as not only will this revitalize our downtown but reinforce the idea of a walkable community as. Seniors who live in downtown core who don’t drive can’t walk to. QE park and there will be a tsunami of senior boomers

     Reply



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