Dr. Blair Roblin ~ the society of the aging

Blair Roblin - Speaker and Barry Wylie President of Canadian Club Halton
Dr. Blair Roblin ~ the society of the aging
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About the Author

Janet Bedford

Janet Bedford is a broker with Royal LePage in downtown Oakville, with 20 years of real estate experience. Along with helping her clients find the perfect home or sell their home, she is often found photographing the many events that take place in Oakville. She has written extensively for various publications.

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Dr. Blair Roblin was the guest speaker at the recent Canadian Club of Halton dinner. He focused on the biggest social phenomenon to hit the 21st century – the aging of our society. Aging will soon impact all facets of our lives including health care, employment, consumer marketing and technology.

Credentials of Dr. Blair Roblin

  1. PhD in health policy & gerontology from the University of Toronto
  2. Masters degree in disability studies from York University
  3. Masters of Business Administration
  4. Bachelor of Laws Degree
  5. Chartered Business Valuator designation

As a consultant to business, he draws on 30 plus years of investment banking experience, advising boards and management teams about growth strategies, mergers, acquisitions and capital markets.

“Health care is the largest single expense for most governments, and seniors’ care is the biggest component,” stated Dr. Roblin.

As a researcher in health care services for seniors, he spoke at length about the growing demand for long-term care beds and for home-care alternatives, the lengthening waiting lists and the disparity in the funding of home care services compared to long-term care facilities.

He admitted that his vision of alternative housing through a program he dubbed as “Home Sweet Home” will not work under Ontario’s current regulations. The concept of “Home Sweet Home” is having like-minded seniors:

  1. live together in a private home
  2. helping one another
  3. staying fit
  4. encouraging a healthy life style
  5. continuing to contribute

“The economic implications of aging extend all the way from pension plans to consumer markets. As the role of the older worker expands, management teams and HR departments strive to reconfigure the workplace while the law tries to keep up,” stated Dr. Roblin.

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Ageism, discrimination on the basis of a person’s age, portrays seniors as feeble, senile, bad drivers, depressed, disabled, constipated and lonely. However, seniors today are feeling much younger and “are more focused on creative activity and individual rights and they even look quite different from seniors of the past,” continued Dr. Blair Roblin.

Blair Roblin

Dr. Blair Roblin, Speaker with the Canadian Club Halton Head Table Guests; Photo Credit: Janet Bedford

About the Canadian Club of Halton

The Canadian Club of Halton, with over 200 members, presents 7 guest speaker dinners September through April at the Oakville Conference Centre and is now in its 33rd season. The next speaker on November 15th is Travis Steffens, PhD, Environmental Anthropology – Founder and Executive Director, Planet Madagascar with a presentation titled “Lemurs, Forests, and People: Building Sustainable Forest Communities in Madagascar”.

Non-members are welcome. Reservations are required. For more information, visit www.canadianclubhalton.ca.

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Readers Comments (1)

  1. Vera-D. says:

    There are seniors and then there are the old-old. The problem is lumping everybody 60 to 95 into the senior category. Eventually, so 80+, you have a 50% chance of having Alzheimer’s, many are disabled and most are bad drivers due to eyesight and reflexes. An 80 year old woman today is actually more likely to be disabled than an 80 year old woman in 1980. We’ve increased morbidity so extended the unhealthy years, particularly for women.


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